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Electrical Panel Precaution for a Catastrophic Failure

Electrical Panel Precaution: Contain Any Release of Energy in the Electrical Panel

If you have a catastrophic failure in your electrical system be sure the electrical panel is:

  • securely bolted with all the regulated number of bolts
  • fully closed
  • showing no bowing of the panels
  • showing no openings

All of the above are necessary in order to contain any release of energy due to a catastrophic failure.

It is important to check all electrical equipment and panels. Preventive maintenance including inspection, testing, and servicing of electrical equipment should be done on a regular basis. Contact Reuter Hanney, The Electrical Power Specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

 

Electrical Equipment Labels Protect Workers

Electrical Equipment LabelsElectrical Equipment Labels Guidelines to Protect Workers

Electrical equipment labels protect workers who may be involved in servicing or maintenance. The installer must ensure the labels are applied and correctly oriented so they are clearly visible to qualified persons before examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance of the equipment.

According to NFPA 130.7, Electrical equipment such as switchboards, panelboards, industrial control panels, meter socket enclosures, and motor control panels, and motor control centers that are in other than dwelling units, and are likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance while energized, shall be field marked with a label containing all the following information:

1) At least one of the following:

  • Available incident energy and the corresponding working distance
  • Minimum arc rating of clothing
  • Required level of PPE
  • Highest Hazard/Risk Category (HRC) for the equipment

2) Nominal system voltage
3) Arc flash boundary

Proper electrical equipment labels is a hazard reminder that gives the worker specific information that will help to assess the workplace to determine if hazards are present and what action is needed.

Preventive maintenance including inspection, testing, and servicing of electrical equipment should be done on a regular basis. Contact Reuter Hanney, The Electrical Power Specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

Limited Approach Boundary Rules

Limited Approach Boundary Rules - NFPA 70E Rules Review

Limited Approach Boundary Rules – NFPA 70E Rules Review

NFPA 70-E, Section 130.4 (D) (1) (2), Rules for Unqualified Person(s) Working at or Close to the Limited Approach Boundary are very specific:

(1)  Where one or more unqualified persons are working at or close to the limited approach boundary, the designated person in charge of the work space where the electrical hazard exists shall:

a.     Advise the unqualified person(s) of the electrical hazard and
b.    warn him or her to stay outside of the limited approach boundary

(2)  Entering the Limited Approach Boundary. Where there is a need for an unqualified person(s) to cross the limited approach boundary, a qualified person shall:

a.     Advise him or her of the possible hazards
b.    Escort the unqualified person(s) while inside the limited approach boundary.

Under no circumstance shall the escorted unqualified person(s) be permitted to cross the restricted approach boundary.

NFPA 70E: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace provides requirements for safe work practices to protect personnel by reducing exposure to major electrical hazards. 

Preventive maintenance including inspection, testing, and servicing of electrical equipment should be done on a regular basis. Contact Reuter Hanney, The Electrical Power Specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

NETA Certification: When “Qualified” Isn’t Certified

NETA CertificationNETA Certification: When “Qualified” Isn’t Certified

Today, virtually every electrical testing company has a website. Most of them make some reference to NETA (InterNational Electrical Testing Association), the professional organization that establishes industry standards for electrical testing companies. But what many of these companies can’t do, unlike Reuter Hanney, is display the symbol that comes with NETA certification.

NETA certification doesn’t come easily. It’s earned during a rigorous 18-month process of stringent inspections, detailed testing, precise calibration of all test equipment, and perhaps more importantly, technicians who have taken and passed NETA written certification tests. In addition, NETA certification calls for technicians to complete a minimum of 48 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) within a three year period to stay current with an industry that is always evolving and advancing.

Many companies, especially those that are primarily electrical contractors, use phrases like “NETA qualified” or “Meet NETA specifications” to suggest they meet NETA standards. But unless they have a NETA certification, you have no assurance of their qualifications to conduct electrical testing, or that any of their other claims are true.

When you’re tasked with choosing an electrical testing company, it pays to look for the NETA symbol. It’s one we wear with pride at Reuter Hanney. Contact Reuter Hanney, The Electrical Power Specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

 

 

Generator Rental – Prepare for Disaster

Generator RentalGenerator Rental – Better Too Soon Than Too Late

A generator rental can help maintain power distribution when you need to respond to a natural disaster.  If you wait until you really need it, it can be far too late. The power grid we take for granted most days is still highly vulnerable to severe weather. Whether you’re responsible for a nursing home full of residents, a dormitory filled with students, or a high-efficiency production line, the time to think about auxiliary generator rental is long before the first rain drop or snow flake falls.

The solution to this problem is really a simple one. First, determine what level of generator you need for your application. If you’re not sure, Reuter Hanney can provide expert assistance in determining your requirements. Then, reserve early. There are only a finite number of emergency generators available at any given time. If you wait until a dangerous weather event is forecast, or is in its early stages, chances are you’ll find your rental opportunities have disappeared.

When it comes to generator rental, proactive is preferable to reactive every time. Make your disaster response plans now. You never know when you’re going to have to act on them.  Even with backup generators, power outages during a natural disaster can be difficult to prevent. Add a generator rental to ensure all your operations run according to plan. Call us or email us today at bids@reuterhanney.com to help you get better prepared.

Electrical Safety Equipment Hazards

Electrical Safety Equipment HazardsElectrical Safety Equipment Hazards – Company Equipment Required!

Establish a protocol for safe work practices and electrical safety management requirements. Employees must use approved electrical safety equipment that meets or exceeds recognized industry standards.

Three reasons employees should not use their own electrical safety equipment:

1- No control over when the equipment was tested last
2- No control over quality of product
3- You will increase your exposure to potential increased liability if an accident occurs

Contact Reuter Hanney, The Electrical Power Specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

Testing Electromechanical Relays

Testing Electromechanical RelaysTesting electromechanical relays involves the following steps:
• An inspection of the relay for loose screws, friction in moving parts, iron filings between induction discs and permanent magnets, and any evidence of damage to the relay.
• Correct settings should be applied or verified.
• Pickup Test: measures the point where contacts just close for a particular parameter
• Timing Test: measures the time to close contacts at a particular multiple of pickup applied to the relay.
• Instantaneous Test: if used, measures the point where instantaneous contacts close with no time delay
• Test of target and seal-in unit: if used, target indicates the relay has operated and seal in contact holds contacts closed until breaker trips.
• Test of Tripping Circuit.

Protective relays should be acceptance tested prior to being placed in service. Thereafter, they should be tested periodically to ensure reliable performance.  In normal industrial applications, relays should be tested at least every 2 years. In critical systems, testing should be conducted at least annually.

Contact Reuter Hanney, the electrical power specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

Technician Tips to Test Relays

Technician TipsTechnician Tips

In order to test relays, the technician should:
• Understand the construction, operation, and testing of the particular relay
• Have the manufacturer’s instruction manual available
• Be given the settings to be applied to the relay and test points
• Have a test instrument available that is suitable to conduct tests on a particular relay
• Be allowed to trip the associated circuit breaker to ensure the relay trip contacts will operate the breaker

Protective relays should be acceptance tested prior to being placed in service. Thereafter, they should be tested periodically to ensure reliable performance.  In normal industrial applications, relays should be tested at least every 2 years. In critical systems, testing should be conducted at least annually.

Contact Reuter Hanney, the electrical power specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

Protective Relays Types

Protective Relays TypesThree Protective Relays Types are:
• Electromechanical
• Solid state
• Numerical

Protective relays should be acceptance tested prior to being placed in service. Thereafter, they should be tested periodically to ensure reliable performance.  In normal industrial applications, relays should be tested at least every 2 years. In critical systems, testing should be conducted at least annually.

Contact Reuter Hanney, the electrical power specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

Electrical Systems Anomalies

Electrical SystemsProtective relays are designed to respond to electrical systems anomalies in:
• Current
• Voltage
• Frequency
• Phase angle
• Direction of current or power flow
• And other parameters

Protective relays should be acceptance tested prior to being placed in service. Thereafter, they should be tested periodically to ensure reliable performance.  In normal industrial applications, relays should be tested at least every 2 years. In critical systems, testing should be conducted at least annually.

Contact Reuter Hanney, the electrical power specialists, today at bids@reuterhanney.com for a review of your company’s electrical equipment needs and to learn more about safety, and safety maintenance procedures.

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